Upcoming Events
  • Mon
    17
    May
    2021

    Join us for a Christian Heritage zoom webinar

    +++

    Obedient Subversiveness:

    How the Bible Creates Cultural Critics

     

    with Dr Chris Watkin

    on

    Monday, May 17th at 7:30pm BST

     

    Christians have not always had a reputation for their depth and breadth of engagement in culture and the arts. Where they have fallen short of practising discerning cultural engagement, Dr Chris Watkin argues that it is because they have wandered away from the nature and teaching of the Christian Scriptures. In this webinar, we will see how the Bible embodies and encourages cultural engagement of the broadest and most penetrating sort. We will note that the Bible is peculiarly able to furnish favourable conditions for a cultural criticism which is expansive in scope yet disciplined in analysis, warmly affirming, acutely critiquing and subversively fulfilling the aspirations of our cultural life. Indeed, we will explore just how it is that the Bible creates wise cultural critics.

     

    After a presentation from Dr Watkin, there will be the opportunity for discussion and Q and A on the topic of the Bible and cultural engagement.

     

    Sign up here

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Public Christianity Tag

Kevin Moss is Director of Operations at Christian Heritage and a PhD candidate in intellectual history. In the wake of the recent insanities on Capitol Hill, I have taken to re-reading Gertrude Himmelfarb’s excellent book, On Looking Into the Abyss: Untimely Thoughts on Culture and Society. Published in 1994, it is perhaps unlikely that Himmelfarb (who died towards the end of 2019) would have anticipated these events, as unlikely as it would have been for John Stuart Mill to have anticipated the outworking of his thesis, On Liberty, the book which has been a foundational influence on modern liberalism. Mill’s work benefits from a very clear-sighted critique in Chapter IV of Himmelfarb’s book, entitled Liberty: “One Very Simple Principle”? which demonstrates that the kind of reductionism at the heart of On Liberty has not weathered the passage of time very well. Indeed, the clue to the fundamental weakness in Mill’s optimism about liberalism is to be found in another of his essays, Nature, written only a few months before he commenced On Liberty. It would be difficult to find two views of human nature which had less in common, but it was the naïvely optimistic one which prevailed, because it was...