Upcoming Events
  • Mon
    11
    Oct
    2021

    Join us in person in the Round Church or by livestream

    +++

    Aesthetics and the Knowledge of God

     

    with Matt Peckham

     

    on

    Monday, October 11th at 7:30pm BST

     

    Whether in story or poetry, through imagery or imagination, aesthetic experience brings significant meaning to our lives. But is this meaning merely subjective? Do aesthetics and the affections help the pursuit of truth or hinder it? And how might the Bible help us understand the interplay between 'head knowledge' and 'heart knowledge'?

     

    Join us as we consider the role that aesthetics plays in how we come to know things, revealing as we do the affective nature of knowing with its practical and theological implications.

     

    We hope you will consider joining us in person in the Round Church for this talk! A livestream link will also be added here closer to the event date for those who are unable to come in person.

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Ethics Tag

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