Upcoming Events
  • Mon
    29
    Mar
    2021

    Join us for a Christian Heritage zoom event

    +++

    The Death of Death:

    How Easter Changes Everything

     

    with Dr Gary Habermas

    on

    Monday, March 29th at 7:30pm BST

     

    At the heart of Christianity is a claim with wild implications: that the Son of God, Jesus Christ, was put to death at the hands of Roman soldiers and yet, less than 72 hours later, was alive again. The wild implications: that he really was who he claimed to be, and that his resurrection resoundingly defeated death, giving hope of our own resurrection to come. We put faith in many things to prolong our lives – vaccines, tofu, kombucha – and yet still have not found a way to defeat what the Bible calls 'the last enemy', death itself. Could it be that the Easter Story has something to say to a society striving for eternity?

     

    After a presentation from Dr Habermas, there will be the opportunity for discussion and Q and A.

     

    Zoom Registration Link Coming Soon

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December 2020

Kevin Moss is a Christian Heritage trustee and PhD candidate in intellectual history. One of the many joys of historical research is that one gets to meet great minds that have somehow fallen through the cracks of popular history.  One such, for me, has been Johann Georg Hamann (1730-88), a profound German Enlightenment thinker with a propensity for dark and enigmatic writings.  In recent years, there has been a gentle flourishing of translations of his literary contributions (many remain untranslated from the German), and I have recently benefited enormously from John R. Betz’ After Enlightenment, the Post-Secular Vision of J. G. Hamann (2012, Wiley-Blackwell). Hamann’s is an unusual mind, given his context.  He turned from the sterility of continental Enlightenment to a robust, evangelical Christian faith – and in that turning became something of a focus for secular acquaintances who regarded his sincere faith as an affront to their values.  Through their influence, he was introduced to Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) in the hope that the great philosopher would reclaim this errant Enlightenment heretic, but what actually emerged was an improbable friendship, one where Hamann certainly gave as good as he got.  Essentially, Hamann provided one of the best, and certainly one of...