Upcoming Events
  • Thu
    10
    Oct
    2019

    The Cost of Complacency: Are We Still Pro-Life?

    12:45 pmThe Round Church

    A talk and discussion with Denny Hertford of Vital Signs Ministries which asks the question, 'Are we still pro-life?'

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Projects

Round Church red logo

Christian Heritage Research Projects

Our projects, undertaken in the Round Church Scriptorium, seek to explore historical and contemporary questions relating to the Christian worldview, with a view to the advocacy of its enduring reality and relevance. The projects provide material for lunch time discussion & seminars, publication, and talks.

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Abolition Project with human and robot hands reaching for each other, the creation of AI

The Abolition Project

From discussions about Artificial Intelligence, genetic engineering and transhumanism, to the sanctity of life and issues around modern-day slavery, the way we think about what it is to be human has profound and far-reaching implications. Today, our society’s embrace of two incompatible philosophies, naturalism and secular humanism, pulls us between seeing the human person as a biological machine with no ultimate purpose, on the one hand, and a demi-god capable of ruling without limits on the other. Into this context, the Abolition Project aims to engage contemporary thought about the human person with a comprehensive biblical anthropology.

Email the Research Coordinator, Andrew Fellows:
andrew.fellows@christianheritage.org.uk
Christ and the University Project with view of Cambridge from the roof of King's College Chapel

Christ and the University

The University is a unique institution, and a symbol of knowledge and culture. Historically, it has been an unmistakably religious institution, committed to a belief in and a pursuit of truth, as revealed in God’s Word (Scripture) and by God’s works (nature). It has aspired both to push back the boundaries of human understanding through research, and to pass on the fruits of learning through education. Today this dual mission is under heavy fire, and the very notion of a unified field of knowledge is considered passé. The Christ and the University Project aims to explore the Christian origins of the University, assess the ramifications of the loss of these religious roots and imagine what the University could be if its Christian heritage was to ground it once again. By attending to past, present and future dimensions of the relationship between the University and Christian faith, the project is aimed at a multi-faceted reassessment of what the University can and should be.

Email the Research Coordinator, Joshua Kellard:
joshua.kellard@christianheritage.org.uk
Foundations Project with weathered brick and cement wall

Foundations

Foundations seeks to outline the fundamental commitments of a Christian philosophy. We will explore questions like, how do we arrive at real knowledge? What is the nature of reality? How does a civilisation work? Developing a coherent world and life view is essential to address contemporary issues. The foundations project aims to spell out and develop some of the key intellectual commitments of a robust Christian philosophy.

Email the Research Coordinator, Andrew Fellows:
andrew.fellows@christianheritage.org.uk
Plausibility Project with sun shining through clouds

The Plausibility Project

How do things occupy or leave ‘the realm of possibility’? How is it that some ideas and beliefs are plausible and others are not? An idea or belief’s plausibility is tightly bound to the unique philosophical foundations of the cultural moment in question; to what sociologist Peter Berger refers to as ‘plausibility structures’. This project seeks to explore what plausibility is, how plausibility operates, and how past and present cultures, with their unique ‘plausibility structures’, have received and responded to the Christian worldview in such different ways.

Email the Research Coordinator, Jack Harding:
jack.harding@christianheritage.org.uk